Posts filed under Platinum

Platinum 3776 Kumpoo Fountain Pen: A Review

The Platinum Kumpoo pictured with a replica of the Tyndale New Testament

The Platinum Kumpoo pictured with a replica of the Tyndale New Testament

(Susan M. Pigott is a fountain pen collector, pen and paperholic, photographer, and professor. You can find more from Susan on her blog Scribalishess.)

Lately I have been on a turquoise fountain-pen-buying binge. One of my purchases was the Platinum 3776 Kumpoo fountain pen with a soft medium nib.

The Kumpoo.jpg

The pen comes in a turquoise outer cardboard box and white, clamshell inner box. Included are a Platinum pamphlet, a warranty card, a blotting card with a description of the pen, and one cartridge.

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“Kumpoo” is a Japanese word that means “balmy breeze.” The Platinum 3776 Kumpoo fountain pen is designed to evoke the breezes that blow around Mt. Fuji in Japan. Thus, the pen’s surface is carved with waves that represent those balmy breezes and the color of the pen reflects the beautiful skies surrounding Mt. Fuji.

Breezes.jpg

Even the metal piece in the finial is a tribute to Mt. Fuji.

Mt Fuji.jpg

Each pen cap is engraved with a limited edition number. Mine is 1551 out of 2500.

Limited Edition Number.jpg

The cap has a smooth silver clip and a ring engraved with “Platinum 3776 Century Made in Japan.”

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The pen is medium-sized at 5.5 inches/139.7mm capped, 4.7 inches/119.8mm uncapped, and 6 inches/152.4 posted. It weighs only 24.3 grams.

Pen Uncapped.jpg

The pen fills via cartridge or the included converter. Platinum converters only hold 0.5ml of ink, so expect to refill it often if you write lengthy tomes. One thing I like about Platinum converters is, if the converter gets sticky over time, you can disassemble it and use silicone grease to get it working properly again.

Converter.jpg

I chose a medium-soft 14k nib. Platinum nibs are much more narrow than Western nibs, so a medium is really like a Western fine. I have several Platinum 3776 pens, and my favorite size nib is the medium. The soft-medium is especially nice. It gives the nib some spring while you write, but it is not meant to be a flex nib, so there’s little line variation.

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Writing with the Kumpoo is a pleasure. The nib is smooth and bouncy, and the pen itself is comfortable in the hand. Since Platinum nibs and Nakaya nibs are made by the same manufacturer, you can enjoy the experience of a Nakaya in a much less expensive pen.

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I really love my Platinum Kumpoo. It’s a beautiful pen, especially with the added texture, which picks up light and makes it stand out from standard Platinum fountain pens. I owned an Omas Ogiva in turquoise with an extra flessibile nib. I wanted to love that pen because I paid an awful lot for it; plus it was a piston filler. But, the Omas was frustrating from the beginning--ink kept leaking into the grip section and the pen would dry out quickly. The Kumpoo is just as beautiful as the Omas, and even though it isn’t a piston-filler, the Platinum “slip and seal” mechanism in the cap means that the pen does not dry out. The soft-medium nib might not have flex, but it offers one of the best writing experiences.

Unfortunately, finding a Platinum Kumpoo may be pretty difficult now. All the dealers I checked (Goldspot, Goulet, JetPens, nibs.com, Pen Chalet, and Vanness) were out of stock. That said, Platinum is apparently producing several pens in the Fuji Shunkei series (the first was the Shungyo and the second is the Kumpoo). So, even if you can’t get this particular limited edition, hopefully new editions will be added to the series.

Pros

  • In my opinion this is one of the most beautiful iterations of the Platinum 3776 series because of the textured surface and the color.
  • I love all the symbolism the creators included in the pen.
  • The pen is a good size for most users and is very light.
  • The soft-medium nib is my favorite nib. It is smooth and bouncy and writes perfectly.

Cons

  • Writers who prefer pens with heft will probably think the Platinum is too light and plasticky.
  • The converter only holds 0.5ml of ink (though cartridges hold 1.5ml).
  • Unfortunately, the Kumpoo seems to be sold out or nearly sold out, so if you want one, you’ll need to keep your eye on sales at pen forums or eBay.

(I purchased my Platinum Kumpoo from Vanness Pens at a discount.)


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Posted on August 31, 2018 and filed under Platinum, Fountain Pens, Pen Reviews.

Platinum 3776 Oshino Fountain Pen Review

Platinum 3776 Oshino Review

One of the challenges with reviewing products is keeping it fresh. I never run out of things to review, but at the same time, I often review products that are nearly identical aside from aesthetics.

The Platinum 3776 lineup is the epitome of this.

The Platinum 3776 Oshino great pen from a great brand. A brand I love, and a brand I have praised on these pages and in other forms repeatedly. Heck, I even named Platinum the 2017 brand of the year in the Pen Addict members newsletter. But we are at the point now where I am reviewing barrel colors. Luckily, their barrel colors are very cool.

Platinum 3776 Oshino Nib

Let’s get the core features out of the way. Platinum has two primary things that separate them from the competition: The nib, and the slip & seal cap mechanism.

Taking the second one first, this is a fantastic addition to any fountain pen. In the clear-barrel Oshino, you can see the mechanism in action, with an extended cap liner and spring giving the pen a tight seal when stored away. The enemy of fountain pen nibs is air, which can cause the nib to dry out and the ink to not flow without priming. Not in the 3776 lineup. The slip & seal gives the cap complete airtightness. I’ve left a 3776 inked for months without use, and upon uncapping and writing, it was like I had inked it for the first time.

Platinum 3776 Oshino Cap

As flawless as the cap seal is, the nib is even better. For my money, it is the best of the big three (Pilot, Platinum, Sailor) in this price point. I prefer both Sailor and Pilot from a design and variety standpoint, but Platinum makes a better nib. No matter the size, they are perfect out of the box every time in my experience. And, they offer a good mix of sizes for many models, such as Ultra Extra Fine, Soft Medium, and Music. Not all models have all options, but Platinum seems to be expanding their offerings.

Platinum 3776 Oshino Writing

The one con that comes up when mentioning the 3776 it is that it is lightweight. At approximately 20 grams, it is in the weight range of the Pilot 74 and Sailor Pro Gear Slim - the entry level gold nib pens for those respective brands - while being priced like next tier options, like the Pilot 912 and Sailor Pro Gear Standard. I do find the 3776 to be light, but not flimsy. It is a sturdy pen and I’ve never considered it to be fragile.

I recommend the 3776 constantly, and often over the competition depending on the context of the question. That said, is it wrong for me to want more from the brand on a personal level? Where are the updated stock colors? How about some solid, non-translucent offerings? Or maybe some alternate cap, section, or finial materials? I see a big opportunity for me to give Platinum more of my money, but they seem content with where they are at.

And who am I to argue? They are great pens.

(Goldspot Pens provided this product at no charge to The Pen Addict for review purposes.)


Enjoy reading The Pen Addict? Then consider becoming a member to receive additional weekly content, giveaways, and discounts in The Pen Addict shop. Plus, you support me and the site directly, for which I am very grateful.

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Platinum 3776 Oshino Rhodia
Posted on July 2, 2018 and filed under Platinum, Fountain Pens, Pen Reviews.

The Masuya Monokaki Pocket Notebook and the Platinum Plaisir Fountain Pen: A Good Everyday Carry Set

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(Susan M. Pigott is a fountain pen collector, pen and paperholic, photographer, and professor. You can find more from Susan on her blog Scribalishess.)

I received the Masuya Monokaki Pocket Notebook several months ago from JetPens, but I have so many notebooks, I hadn’t had a chance to use it until now. The pocket notebook is an interesting size (14.0 cm /5.5 inches in length and 8.6 cm /3.4 inches in width), and it has 64 sheets printed on both sides with 0.7mm graph lines.

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The notebook has a soft cardboard cover with a cool design on the front, and it is thread and glue bound.

Cover.jpg

The cream-colored paper is fountain-pen friendly, but it is also very thin, so if you don’t like your writing to show through, you will not like this paper. I tested it with several different nib sizes and inks. There was no feathering or bleed-through. However, as you can see in the second photo below, there’s plenty of show through.

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Fountain Pen Show Through.jpg

I also tested the paper with various gel pens, rollerballs, and pencils. It works well with all of them, but, once again, show through is obvious.

Regular Pen Test.jpg
Regular Pen Show Through.jpg

The Monokaki notebook is the perfect size for purses, satchels, and backpacks. But, the soft cover is easily bent, so you’ll want to put it in a pocket or sleeve to protect it. The notebook does not lay flat when open, which is a weakness. The 7mm graph lines almost seem too large for a notebook this size, and since show through is unavoidable, you probably won’t want to write on both sides of the paper. You will get the best results from fine nibs and/or pencils.

You can purchase the Monokaki Pocket Notebook from JetPens for $7.75.

Plaisir on Leaves.jpg

The Platinum Plaisir fountain pen is an aluminum pen with a stainless steel Preppy nib. It is available in a wide array of colors that have a beautiful iridescent finish.

Plaisir on Cement.jpg

The pen comes with one black Platinum cartridge (which is proprietary, so you’ll have to buy extras), but you can use a Platinum converter (not included) if you prefer. I wanted to use an orange ink with my Plaisir, so I put in a converter.

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The Platinum Plaisir is an inexpensive pen at $14.25. That’s not bad for a metal pen. It’s comfortable to hold, especially since the grip is plastic not metal. It’s a small pen unposted (4.8 inches). Posted it is 5.8 inches, and capped it is 5.6 inches.

Plaisir Uncapped.jpg

The grip is transparent, so you can see the ink filtering down to the nib. Although you can remove the nib to clean the pen, the ink pools in the threads in the grip, and it doesn’t rinse out so easily.

Grip.jpg

The cap snaps on securely and it is postable. It’s got a basic steel clip and a large steel cap ring with the words “Platinum Plaisir Japan.” The pen is quite beautiful.

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The fine nib is smooth but rigid. I tested it with Kyo-iro 04 Higashiyama Moonlight (reviewed here), and that ink was simply too dry for this fine of a nib. Iroshizuku Fuyu-Gaki flowed much better.

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Although the pen is meant to be rugged, I noticed dents in the body and scratches. This pen has not been roughly handled, and I didn’t let it loose in my purse where it could get scratched. I think the dents may have come from posting the cap. Regardless, the pen is definitely not as durable as you might expect.

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The Platinum Plaisir comes in a whole rainbow of colors and you can get each color with either a fine or medium nib. You can purchase the Plaisir from JetPens for $14.25.

Plaisir on Ivy.jpg

The Monokaki Pocket Notebook and Platinum Plaisir are a perfect match for one another if you are looking for an everyday carry set.

(JetPens provided this product at no charge to The Pen Addict for review purposes.)


Enjoy reading The Pen Addict? Then consider becoming a member to receive additional weekly content, giveaways, and discounts in The Pen Addict shop. Plus, you support me and the site directly, for which I am very grateful.

Membership starts at just $5/month, with a discounted annual option available. To find out more about membership click here and join us!

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Posted on April 6, 2018 and filed under Monokaki, Platinum, Pen Reviews, Notebook Reviews.