Posts filed under Platinum

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Review

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Review

(Jeff Abbott is a regular contributor at The Pen Addict. You can find more from Jeff online at Draft Evolution and Twitter.)

As someone who loves pens, writing, and all things stationery, I'm a bit embarrassed that I haven't given the Platinum pens more attention. I've never disliked them; it's more of a combined time/attention/money problem. This year, I decided to start wading into the Platinum fountain pens and nib assortments. To start this journey, I chose a fairly affordable Platinum Procyon.

Prior to this pen, my only other Platinum pen experience are a handful of different Preppy models, and trying out different Platinums at the Atlanta Pen Show. As you can see, I only have experience with disparate ends of Platinum's fountain pen offerings. The Procyon hits a rare price point — $53 as of this writing — that always interests me. It's not crazy expensive when comparing against the complete market of fountain pens, but it's also not a highly-affordable plastic disposable pen, either. If manufacturers can nail this price point with a pen that performs well and is a joy to use, they've won.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen

The Procyon borrows its name from a star — the brightest star in the Canis Minor constellation — and is intended to "brighten" the writing experience. While this is cheesy marketing, it's still a pretty cool name. But does it brighten the writing experience? The simple answer is yes.

The exterior of the pen is a classy aluminum with either a high polish finish or a matte texture depending on the color option. In the case of my unit, the porcelain white finish is shiny without being flashy. It's a great finish, and I've really enjoyed the color, even though the orange one is really calling my name.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Clip

The clip is very sleek and also quite strong. The pen is very secure when attached to something, and I haven't any issues with it coming loose in my bag or pants pocket when on the move. The top of the cap and the bottom of the pen body both feature a convex shape that adds a bit of depth to the pen and borrows from other popular models in a higher price range. Throughout these pens, the accents are all chrome.

To open the pen, simply unscrew the cap. Unlike a lot of screw caps, this one only needs a half turn to open or close. It's a very smooth motion, and after getting used to it, I kind of wish all my pens only required half a turn to open and close. The threads are smooth and it feels like a much more expensive pen when handling the cap system.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Open

Another incredibly nice feature of this cap is what Platinum call the "Slip and Seal" system. Basically, you can leave this pen capped and unused for weeks (maybe even months?) and it will write like a champ when you decide to pick it back up. No skipping, hard starts, stuttering — just smooth ink comes out after weeks of no use. I tried this myself, and I was impressed. If you're like me and tend to have too many pens inked up at a time, this is a great feature.

Once the pen is uncapped and it's time to write, you notice the translucent dark gray grip section. It's plastic and looks significantly cheaper than the rest of the pen. But, it feels great in the hand. The small ridge at the base of the grip is a perfect tactile bump for your fingers when writing, and the plastic is smooth but still grippy. And the translucency also cuts down on visible finger prints.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Nib

The one area that this pen obviously cut costs is the aesthetics of the nib. It's a great writer, but it looks like the same nib that comes on the Preppy, which are just a few bucks. The shape is very simple, there's no scroll work or decorative touch, leaving it plain and uninspiring. That being said, it does have a small Platinum "P" logo and a the nib size information, but these are just the basics when it comes to nibs. I understand that this price point is difficult to hit, but it would have been great to add something to this nib to differentiate it from the $5 Preppy nibs.

So maybe it doesn't look fancy, but how does it write? The good news is, it writes exceptionally well. The model I have features a fine nib, and it's not a disappointment. The nib is stiff and steadfast while remaining smooth and consistent. I've done zero modifications to the nib simply because it wrote perfectly out of the box. For a pen in this price range, I wish I could say this is the normal experience, but it just isn't. This is a great writer, and I couldn't be happier with it. There's almost no flex in this nib, but that's not to be expected in a Japanese fine unless otherwise mentioned in the product description. If you like a nib that's firm as a nail while also being smooth and consistent, you can't go wrong here.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Barrel

I've really enjoyed writing with the Platinum Procyon over the last several months. I wasn't sure what I'd think of it based on the price and description, but it has surprised me and earned its place on my desk.

The Platinum Procyon is available in Porcelain White (featured here), Deep Sea, Persimmon Orange, Citron Yellow, and Turquoise Blue. The Deep Sea color-way also has an option of Fine or Medium nibs, but the rest of the colors are only available with a Fine nib.

(JetPens provided this product at no charge to The Pen Addict for review purposes.)


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Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Writing
Posted on July 17, 2019 and filed under Platinum, Fountain Pens, Pen Reviews.

Platinum Procyon Citron Yellow Fountain Pen: A Review

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Review

(Susan M. Pigott is a fountain pen collector, pen and paperholic, photographer, and professor. You can find more from Susan on her blog Scribalishess.)

The Platinum Procyon is an aluminum fountain pen with a matte finish. It is packaged in a black box and comes with one blue cartridge but no converter. My pen also came with three special “commemorative colors:” aqua emerald, dark violet, and gold ochre. These are mixable colors, but I’m not sure how you’re supposed to mix ink that comes in cartridges. Regardless, the commemorative colors will be available only while supplies last.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen

The screw-on cap is adorned with a chrome clip and band. “Procyon” and “Platinum Made in Japan” are printed on the cap in silver lettering.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Cap

Although the cap and barrel are made of aluminum, the grip is a smoky black, semi-transparent plastic. I like the plastic grip because my fingers don’t slip as easily.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Grip

The fine stainless steel nib is quite plain--no scrollwork or fancy styling. There’s only a letter “P” and the nib size on the face of the nib. It looks very similar to the nib that comes on the $4.00 Platinum Preppy.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Nib

As is typical of Japanese nibs, the fine writes more like an extra fine. So, if you prefer a Western-size fine, you’ll want to order a medium. The nib is smooth-ish, but because it is so fine, it sometimes catches the paper on upstrokes. It’s also rather noisy, which surprised me. I don’t know if the aluminum barrel conducts the sound or if it’s just a characteristic of this steel nib, but the scritch-scratching of my writing was quite noticeable. Usually, I enjoy the sounds of a nib on paper, but this was actually rather distracting.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Writing

The pen is medium sized, measuring 5.5 inches/140mm capped, 4.7 inches/119mm uncapped, and 6.1 inches/155mm posted. Overall it weighs 24 grams, but uncapped it weighs only 13 grams. Posting is certainly possible, but because the cap alone weighs 11 grams, it throws the balance off considerably. The grip is a very useable size (10.3mm)--not too skinny or too fat.

Platinum Procyon Fountain Pen Barrel

You can get the Procyon in several different colors: Deep Sea (a dark navy blue), Turquoise, Persimmon Orange (a muted orange), Porcelain White, and Citron Yellow. I thought I saw a photo of a matte black Procyon, maybe on Instagram, but I can’t find any references to one on the Internet.

The Platinum Procyon costs $53 at JetPens, which I think is a little overpriced, especially since it does not come with a converter and the nib is so basic. But, if you want a stylish pen with good heft, a screw-on cap, and a simple steel nib, the Procyon might be a good fit for you. I suggest adding a Platinum converter ($8.25) to your cart so you can use bottled ink with it.

(JetPens provided this product at no charge to The Pen Addict for review purposes.)


Enjoy reading The Pen Addict? Then consider becoming a member to receive additional weekly content, giveaways, and discounts in The Pen Addict shop. Plus, you support me and the site directly, for which I am very grateful.

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Platinum Procyon
Posted on June 14, 2019 and filed under Platinum, Fountain Pens, Pen Reviews.

Platinum Pigment Brun Sepia Ink Review

Platinum Pigment Brun Sepia Ink Review

(Sarah Read is an author, editor, yarn artist, and pen/paper/ink addict. You can find more about her at her website and on Twitter. And check out her first novel, The Bone Weaver’s Orchard, now available where books are sold!)

Have you ever lost some important writing to a tea spill? Or a water bottle leak? It happens, and it's the worst. I've had a few instances where I needed a truly waterproof ink for a task, but I've always been a bit wary of putting them in my pens. So many carry warnings of stains, clogs, or even pen damage. But I have heard good things about the Platinum Pigment inks, so I gave this lovely Brun Sepia a try.

Platinum Pigment Brun Sepia Ink

I filled my Pelikan M205 and started scribbling. I noticed that the ink in the bottle is opaque and doesn't have the transparent quality of non-pigment inks. The bottle is nice. Blown glass in a sturdy shape that's practical for filling pens. It comes with its own internal inkwell that is designed to make the pen easier to fill when the ink level gets low. It's like a wee plastic wine glass that sits in the bottle. When you flip the bottle upside down (with the lid on, of course), then right it, the small cup will fill with ink, and you can fill your pen from the smaller cup. It's a nice feature.

Platinum Pigment Brun Sepia Ink Dry TIme

The ink flows well when writing, though it is a bit inconsistent. Sometimes it feels like it's dry, with a fainter line, then it gushes a bit and makes darker patches. It looks pretty--like extra shading--but it feels like a behavior issue. And despite the fact that it sometimes feels dry, it's not. In fact, this is one of the longest dry times I've counted out for any ink. It was a full 40 seconds before it was mostly dry, and even then it smudged.

Platinum Pigment Brun Sepia Ink Waterproof

However, once it is dry, it is completely water resistant. I did a drip test, and you'll just have to take my word for it that I did drip water on the ink grid, because not a bit of it moved. I also couldn't really do any kind of chromatography, because I just got a wet line of ink. If this ink's number one job is to be impervious to water--it wins.

Platinum Pigment Brun Sepia Ink Samples

The ink's color is also nice, though nothing amazing. It's a cozy brown, simple enough to be professional, but fun enough to not be boring. I love the old-timey feel of brown inks, and this one doesn't disappoint. It also isn't very similar to anything else in my collection of browns. The closest relative is Montblanc Toffee Brown, but while their swabs look similar, they are completely different in writing. This brown is almost rosy. It's actually the exact color of a Chilean Rose Tarantula…which may not be an endearing comparison for most folks, but it helps to highlight my point that it is a subtly interesting color.

Platinum Pigment Brun Sepia Ink Bottle

Overall, I like this ink, and it does its job well. It has a few faults, namely the dry time, but I feel that's a fair trade for the qualities you do get. It's certainly not going to be an everyday ink for me, but it's the perfect tool for when you need it. Going on a writing hike? Camping? On a deadline with your notebook surrounded by half-forgotten cups of coffee perched precariously close to your work? Definitely time for permanent ink.

Also: My pen has not suffered any ill effects at all. I'll update if it does over a longer period of time, but so far I have zero concerns.

(JetPens provided this product at no charge to The Pen Addict for review purposes.)


Enjoy reading The Pen Addict? Then consider becoming a member to receive additional weekly content, giveaways, and discounts in The Pen Addict shop. Plus, you support me and the site directly, for which I am very grateful.

Membership starts at just $5/month, with a discounted annual option available. To find out more about membership click here and join us!

Platinum Pigment Brun Sepia
Posted on April 25, 2019 and filed under Platinum, Ink Reviews.