Posts filed under Iroshizuku

Pilot Iroshizuku 100th Anniversary Daikokuten Ink Review

Pilot Iroshizuku 100th Anniversary Daikokuten Ink Review

For all the grief I have given Pilot over the past year for their handling of their 100th Anniversary celebration, you knew I was going to participate in it when and where I could. I was hoping it would be a pen, and I was hoping it would be in 2018 - the actual 100th year of the company - but alas, neither were meant to be.

I finally got to join in on the fun last month, as Pilot’s 100th Anniversary Iroshizuku inks hit the US market. Better late than never I guess!

This ink set consists of 7 colors, designed in conjunction with their 7 Gods of Good Fortune maki-e fountain pen set made for their anniversary. On the whole, I was disappointed with the color choices. I would have liked to see Pilot push the boundaries a little more if I’m being honest. That said, there are a couple of interesting colors in this group, none more so than Daikokuten in my eyes.

Pilot Iroshizuku 100th Anniversary Daikokuten Ink

I don’t own a yellow-leaning ink. I have tried a few light oranges in my time, but have never been compelled to go even lighter with yellow. How would this ink look on the page? Would I be able to read it? Can I use it with my favorite extra fine nibs and be happy with it?

As you can tell, Daikokuten requires you to answer a few questions about your ink usage before committing to using it. A simple, basic ink this is not.

Pilot Iroshizuku 100th Anniversary Daikokuten

I’ve shied away from yellow inks in the past because of their inherent lightness. My eyes are bad as it is - why do I want to strain them even more? The pictures and samples of Daikokuten compelled me because it appeared to have some depth and character to it. And, it wasn't as boring as the rest of the 100th Anniversary Iroshizuku lineup. It seemed fun.

So far, it is. I’d say it’s even better than I thought, although it will never be a daily driver for me. This is a special occasion ink, meaning a 50ml bottle is probably not the way to go unless you have a great use case for it.

Pilot Iroshizuku Daikokuten Ink Review

Daikokuten performs as well as any other Iroshizuku ink I have tested, which is to say very well. I chose to use it in a 14k gold Sailor EF nib purposefully. If the edge case ink works well in an edge case nib, then I will be happy - even if this isn’t the recommended setup. Light ink plus wide nib is usually the best combination.

I thought white paper would be the best choice for Daikokuten too, but the cream-colored page of the Yoseka Notebook was the winner. It beat out my other standard choices of Rhodia, Tomoe River, and Apica by a decent margin. With Yoseka paper, I could see the character in the ink that made me want to purchase it in the first place. As I alluded to earlier, your paper choice will effect an ink color this light.

Pilot Iroshizuku Daikokuten Ink

The big question is: Would I recommend this ink to you? Definitely maybe. It’s a fun ink, but not an ink I will use all of the time. That makes it the perfect candidate for an ink sample purchase, or 15ml mini bottle if you can find someone willing to break up the set.

For me, I’m happy to at least have one cool product from Pilot’s 100th Anniversary event.

(I purchased this ink at a discount from Vanness Pens.)


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Pilot Iroshizuku Daikokuten Review
Posted on May 13, 2019 and filed under Pilot, Iroshizuku, Ink Reviews.

Pilot Iroshizuku Murasaki-Shikibu Ink Review

(Jeff Abbott is a regular contributor at The Pen Addict. You can find more from Jeff online at Draft Evolution and Twitter.)

I've tried out several different purple/violet inks over the years, and I'm always surprised by how much variation an ink can achieve in the purple hue. Dark purple, light purple, blue and gray notes, etc. I've always enjoyed using Waterman Tender Purple, but it's a bit bright and has some blue notes. Pilot Iroshizuku Murasaki-shikibu is a purple ink that I think hits a perfect balance of "purple" that works well when you want a standard purple ink to use in your pen.

Most of my previous experience with purple and violet inks is darker than what Murasaki-shikibu offers, and that's part of the delight I enjoy when using it. It's not so bright that it calls unnecessary attention, but it stands out enough to be fun. KWC Gummiberry is a fun ink, but it's also quite a bit darker than this Pilot. Sometimes, a solid standard purple is in the cards, and this is now one of my go-to inks for that purpose.

There is some noticeable shading in this ink, but it's not dramatic. In some cases, you have to search for it on the page. Obviously, the shading effect is more pronounced with a large or stub/italic nib, but it's fairly minor in a medium and smaller. Still, you'll notice shading in some spots, and it's pleasant. When using a larger stub or italic nib, the shading comes out easier, but it's still not dramatic compared to other inks in the Iroshizuku line.

The flow and performance of the ink is fantastic. Easy starts, no skipping, and very forgiving when you forget to cap the pen for a few minutes. The Monteverde I used for this review can sometimes lay down too much ink, but that wasn't a problem with the Murasaki-shikibu. I also used this in a notoriously dry EF Kaweco and had no issues with it. This ink produces very good flow.

Like the Chiku-rin I reviewed, I was really impressed (shocked) by the dry time of this ink. I tried several times and always came back to the 10-second mark consistently. That's an incredibly fast dry time for any fountain pen ink. This is definitely something you should consider if fast dry times are high on your list.

Feathering and bleeding are almost non-existent with this ink, although it does tend to show-through to the back of the page quite easily. This is to be expected for any medium or dark ink, so it's just another point of consideration. Probably not Field Notes friendly, but perfectly fine for thicker, more absorbent papers.

Purple inks aren't always in my rotation, but they continue to fascinate me. Everyone's brain is wired differently when it comes to color, and mine is naturally drawn to bright blues, rich blue greens, fiery oranges, and deep pinks. This purple hits the mark for me when it comes to the definition of purple in my head. It lays down a smooth, clean line and the color is light enough to pop, but still dark enough to produce rich pools of purple goodness. It's definitely worth a try if you're in the market for a solid purple.

Murasaki-shikibu is available in a standard 50ml bottle as well as a smaller 15ml bottle.

(JetPens provided this product at no charge to The Pen Addict for review purposes.)


Enjoy reading The Pen Addict? Then consider becoming a member to receive additional weekly content, giveaways, and discounts in The Pen Addict shop. Plus, you support me and the site directly, which I am very grateful for.

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Posted on February 22, 2017 and filed under Pilot, Iroshizuku, Ink Reviews.

Pilot Iroshizuku Chiku-rin Ink Review

(Jeff Abbott is a regular contributor at The Pen Addict. You can find more from Jeff online at Draft Evolution and Twitter.)

Spring is still a couple months away (at least), but that doesn't mean your ink has to be cold and gloomy. Iroshizuku chiku-rin is a cheery yellow-green ink that comes alive on paper. It's not an orthodox ink color to be sure, but it's delightful to say the least. No matter what's going on, this ink cheers me up.

The English version of chiku-rin is "bamboo forest," which fits this color perfectly. With a wetter nib, you get more saturation of the green, but in most of my pens, this lays down as a light green with yellow accents. If the nib is dry, however, it might be difficult to read your writing later on as the light yellow color doesn't contrast well to white paper. It's also probably safe to say that this ink isn't office friendly. Overall, it's a beautiful color that I love using.

The shading of chiku-rin is great. It's not as dramatic as some inks, but it provides a good range of color depth in most pens. Obviously, the larger the nib, the more variation, but this ink also shades well in smaller nibs due to the light color. I've also used this ink in a Pilot medium nib, and the shading behavior is just as great as with this 1.1mm stub in the review pictures.

I was shocked when I measured the dry time of this ink and found that it is consistently dry after about 8-10 seconds. This is something to consider if fast dry time is important to you. In the world of fountain pen inks, that's a rare dry time. Obviously, this will depend on the nib you're using and the size of the strokes, but for most non-specialty nibs that are medium or smaller, you can count on a quick dry time.

Like every Iroshizuku ink I've used, this ink flows well, has no issues starting, and is generally really well-behaved. It's easy to clean, lubricates the nib nicely, and performs consistently in a variety of nibs. Bleeding hasn't been an issue, but it would be difficult for me to see if there were small amounts due to the light color.

The ink shade is so light that show-through also isn't an issue. In standard Field Notes paper, there will be a fair amount of show-through, but in other fountain pen friendly papers, this won't be an issue. The only time I can see the ink on the opposite side of the page is if the paper is lit from behind.

I'm consistently pleased with every Iroshizuku ink I try, and chiku-rin is no different. With this ink line, you can expect great behavior and ink characteristics. The only real concern you have as a buyer is picking the colors you like. I'm not well-versed in the light green and yellow-green spectrum, but I really do enjoy using this ink fairly often. It goes great with cold, wet, wintery days, but it also looks great on a warm summer day. It's a happy color, and that's probably my favorite thing about it.

Chiku-rin is available in a standard 50ml bottle as well as a smaller 15ml bottle.

(JetPens provided this product at no charge to The Pen Addict for review purposes.)


Enjoy reading The Pen Addict? Then consider becoming a member to receive additional weekly content, giveaways, and discounts in The Pen Addict shop. Plus, you support me and the site directly, which I am very grateful for.

Membership starts at just $5/month, with a discounted annual option available. To find out more about membership click here and join us!

Posted on February 15, 2017 and filed under Pilot, Iroshizuku, Ink Reviews.